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start:panelccc [2018/12/29 19:43]
zora
start:panelccc [2018/12/29 20:01] (Version actuelle)
zora
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 Because marginalized people are often kept apart, their specific threat models and needs are disregarded and not addressed unless we consciously include them in our processes. Sharing our knowledge and expertise to everyone is important, but so is listening to others. This is why we heavily rely on mutual learning so that we can benefit from a diversity of experiences. Additionally,​ providing a space where minorities can feel welcomed allows a diversity of approach and therefore new opportunities to create differently. Within our Queer Games workshops for instance, participants were able to build an arcade machine using 3D printed clitoris as controllers with a Space-Invader like video game that address themes of medical violence. Because marginalized people are often kept apart, their specific threat models and needs are disregarded and not addressed unless we consciously include them in our processes. Sharing our knowledge and expertise to everyone is important, but so is listening to others. This is why we heavily rely on mutual learning so that we can benefit from a diversity of experiences. Additionally,​ providing a space where minorities can feel welcomed allows a diversity of approach and therefore new opportunities to create differently. Within our Queer Games workshops for instance, participants were able to build an arcade machine using 3D printed clitoris as controllers with a Space-Invader like video game that address themes of medical violence.
  
-The hackerspace had to be safer space, so we wrote a code of conduct which includes respect of people’s boundaries, respect of pronouns, no transphobic,​ homophobic or racist behaviour allowed, etc.+The hackerspace had to be the safer possible ​space, so we wrote a code of conduct which includes respect of people’s boundaries, respect of pronouns, no transphobic,​ homophobic or racist behaviour allowed, etc. But writing that down doesn'​t actually change anything. We make sure people feel welcomed, so we dedicate a large part of our time around the workshops to talk to people, make sure they are able to speak out if needed, and also observe dynamics around the place. We practice attentiveness 
 Every sunday, we organize workshops hosted by women and queers. We use twitter a lot and receive many questions of women who did not dare to come to a hackerspace before, and of course, a lot of mansplaining too… We are not here to teach things to our fellow mansplainers,​ we keep our time and energy for the people we want to come to our hackerspace. ​ We apply our code of conduct online. So we let women and queer people know before they come that we will do whatever it takes to keep the place the safer we can. And it works pretty well.  Every sunday, we organize workshops hosted by women and queers. We use twitter a lot and receive many questions of women who did not dare to come to a hackerspace before, and of course, a lot of mansplaining too… We are not here to teach things to our fellow mansplainers,​ we keep our time and energy for the people we want to come to our hackerspace. ​ We apply our code of conduct online. So we let women and queer people know before they come that we will do whatever it takes to keep the place the safer we can. And it works pretty well. 
start/panelccc.txt · Dernière modification: 2018/12/29 20:01 par zora